Articles by alphabetic order
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 Ā Ī Ñ Ś Ū Ö Ō
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0


Lu Jong

From Tibetan Buddhist Encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
10-China-Tibet-Thousand-Hands-Kwan-yin-Av.jpg

Lu Jong is a very old Tibetan Healing exercise in the Vajrayana tradition.

Lu Jong is a higher technique for opening all of the Body’s chakras, which means it opens both the coarse and subtle physical Body. The coarse physical Body is whatever belongs to the five senses. The subtle Body is the 72,000 various channels of the Body. If you want to have a very healthy physical Body, your coarse and subtle Body both need to function very well. Both are very important for anyone that wants to live a long, healthy Life. If someone does spiritual practices but does not open the physical—both coarse and subtle—chakras, it will not be possible to reach a higher state of Mind. Therefore, if you want to practice spiritual ways, know that your Body is the vehicle to reach a higher state of Mind, or, in other words, your Buddha nature. This means that you need to use your Body to reach this place. Whether or not you are a spiritual person, practicing Lu Jong is a great technique to achieve a healthy Body and happy Mind. It makes sense for everyone to practice Lu Jong.

Lu means Body, Jong is the Tibetan word for transformation.

Lu Jong - those are easy, flowing movements from Tibetan medicine, which hermits in the Himalayas use since thousands of years as prevention of diseases. You can get a idea with this video of the bavarian statal television (link to the Video) and this article about Lu Jong, from Yoga Journal Germany.

The effect of Lu Jong is amazing: You become clearer, happier and calmer. The immune system, the bod-sensation and the Mental focus are heightened. Lu Jong is suited for every Body: it doesn‘t matter how flexible or inflexible one‘s Body is, it doesn‘t matter which age one has.

Lu Jong combines Form and movement to repeatedly place gentle pressure on particular points of the Body. The effect of this is to give the channels the opportunity to release blockages and to allow the blocked energies to flow once again.

The continuous movement of the Body quiets the Mind as we focus attention within. This is Meditation in motion. The Lu Jong movements place particular attention on the spine. The spine is our energy box. The spinal column is the root connecting all the Body parts and organs. Disease in one of the organs will begin as a block in the corresponding point of the spine. One could even diagnose unmanifested diseases by finding sensitivities along the spine.

Therefore, by doing movements that touch the entire spine, gently massaging each vertebra, we strengthen the organs.

Lu Jong is very easy - and it can change your Life. Lu Jong comes from Tibetan Buddhism and has its roots in Tibetan medicine.

In the view of Tibetan medicine everything, as well our Body, is based on the five elements, space, earth, water, Fire and wind. The three Body humours - wind, bile and phlegm - are the essential substances. When elements and humours are in Balance, then we are happy.

The Buddha taught us in the Kalachakra Tantra about the thousands of channels that weave throughout our bodies. The health of these channels determines our overall health, since they transport the fluids of the Body, like blood and lymph, as well as oxygen and the Body’s more subtle vital wind, or energy. Beyond heightening our susceptibility to disease, blockages in the channels directly affect the stability of our Mind, manifesting as disturbed emotions and lack of Concentration. Therefore, by devoting attention to the openness and Flexibility of our channels, we are simultaneously improving ourselves on the physical, Mental and energetic levels.

Lu Jong combines Form and movement to repeatedly place gentle pressure on particular points of the Body. The effect of this is to give the channels the opportunity to release blockages and to allow the blocked energies to flow once again.

The continuous movement of the Body also quiets the Mind as we focus attention within, sensitizing ourselves to the Body’s feelings and ceasing the stream of distracting thoughts. This is Meditation in motion.

The Lu Jong movements place particular attention on the mobility of the spine. The spine is the energy box of our bodies. The spinal column is the root connecting all the Body parts and organs. Disease in one of the organs will begin as a block in the corresponding point of the spine. One could even diagnose unmanifested diseases by finding sensitivities along the spine. Therefore, by doing movements that touch the entire spine, gently massaging each vertebra, we strengthen the organs, insuring that they receive the influx of nutrients and oxygen that they require to maintain peak functioning. Good spinal health also means a strong support system for the Body, good posture and good flow of energy.

The theory of Lu Jong recognizes that we are composed of the same building blocks as the natural environment and that being in tune with natural rhythms has a profound positive effect on us. The five elements of space, earth, wind, Fire and water comprise all natural Phenomena, including our bodies, minds, energies, the earth and sea and outer space. The state of the elements is reflected in the state of the natural Phenomena. Therefore, doing a practice such as Lu Jong, which balances and purifies the elements by working with each particular energy in turn, will Balance and purify all aspects of the self. Doing the practice at particular times of the day will also make it that much more effective.


Background ‘Lu’ means Body in Tibetan and ‘jong’ means transformation. Through this bodily practice, we can transform ourselves.

Lu Jong was born from the traditions of both Bön and Tantrayana Buddhism.

Bön is the indigenous belief system of Tibet, well-rooted long before Buddhism was introduced. Bön is based on reverence for the natural environment, including its subtlest aspects, which we have mostly lost touch with today. Through careful observation of the patterns of nature, the Bönpos developed practices that aligned the individual and society with those rhythms in order to reach their fullest potential.

Around 2,500 years ago, Shakyamuni Buddha began spreading the teachings of Buddhism in India. It was until the late 8th century that Padmasambhava, also known as Guru Rinpoche, brought the Buddhist teachings to Tibet. Over time, the veracity of these teachings proved worthy to be adopted by Tibetans. As Buddhism was practiced more widely, many Bön traditions became incorporated into it.

Source

www.tibet-yoga.eu